2018: A Year In Review

As we near the end of 2018, it is only appropriate we thank you for all you do to support Mosaic.

This was a year of growth. Three notable areas include expanding our services to senior citizens, adding new behavioral supports and growing our Rejoicing Spirits program. The countless other signs of growth and change within the organization make the future as bright as our history.

From our earliest days, back in 1913, Mosaic has worked to help people lead meaningful lives. We’ve never limited that to just the people we serve. Meaningful life encompasses our employees, volunteers, partners, family members and donors. Every person who touches Mosaic’s mission finds their life enhanced.

Thank you for being a part of our good news story! Together we are helping bring meaning to life.
Sincerely,

Linda Timmons,
President and Chief Executive Officer

Meaningful Supports

This year, Mosaic expanded its mission to include in-home supports for seniors by acquiring Soreo, an Arizona organization, on November 1.

“Although this is a new service for Mosaic, the focus on serving people in need is the same; these are people who could not afford private services,” said Linda Timmons, Mosaic President and CEO. “Soreo meets their needs and fulfills our mission of service.”

The in-home support model helps seniors stay in their own home and with family as long as possible, avoiding the move to costly long-term care settings. Some of the services provided include companionship, help with bathing, cleaning and meal preparation, and transportation for errands and medical visits. Rather than employees, the services are provided by people who contract with Soreo. They set their own hours, working around what best meets the needs of the people they support.

Through the acquisition, Mosaic now serves an additional 750 people.

Meaningful Interactions

Nearly 60 percent of the people Mosaic supports have a secondary diagnosis of mental illness. To meet that growing need, Mosaic’s national mental and behavioral health professionals provide consultation to staff across the organization so we can serve people better.

Assisting nearly 200 people in 2018, the team’s goal is to help people change behaviors, from undesirable to desirable, said Karen Fry, a mental and behavioral health senior professional.

“Each behavior meets a need for the individual,” Fry said. “Our goal is to determine the need and find a healthy way to fill it. It’s about finding effective ways to change lives for the better.”

To bolster our mental health resources, Mosaic also helps employees become certified behavior analysts. Mosaic continues to develop expert staff to meet the demand for behavioral services. In 2018, seven employees became certified behavior analysts.

Meaningful Worship

Since becoming a part of Mosaic in 2013, Rejoicing Spirits has nearly doubled the number of churches offering this unique model of inclusive worship. In 2018, six new churches joined, bringing the total to 54.

Rejoicing Spirits provides churches a worship model that has a hallmark rule of “no shush.” People with disabilities can be themselves, with no one giving disapproving looks or telling them to “be quiet.” This has helped many families worship together.

“This is ministry the way Jesus intended, bringing people at the margins to the center of what we do and who we are,” said the Rev. Brigette Weier, pastor of faith formation at Bethany Lutheran Church in suburban Denver. “This is the way we should be.”

To bolster our mental health resources, Mosaic also helps employees become certified behavior analysts. Mosaic continues to develop expert staff to meet the demand for behavioral services. In 2018, seven employees became certified behavior analysts.

Thanks For Your Support

Mosaic’s 105-year history is rich with stories that touch the heart.
Our mission is both life-giving and life-changing for everyone involved.

Click below to make your year-end gift to Mosaic.

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