The Power of Kindness

A few weeks ago, a coworker texted me saying she just dropped off three 12-packs of my favorite soda on my front porch. There’s a story behind it – one of thoughtfulness and kindness. 

If you’re a soda drinker, you may be aware that for several months, some varieties of soda were not widely available. That included my favorite drink. I couldn’t find it anywhere. 

It is akin to being a Starbucks fan and told your favorite latte is only sporadically available, and they won’t tell you when or where. Good luck finding it.

Having heard me complain, my coworker saw it in a store and bought what was available and dropped them at my front door.

This is Random Acts of Kindness Week, and February 17 is Random Acts of Kindness Day. I work with some incredibly thoughtful and kind people. It seems to be in the Mosaic DNA, and it goes to the heart of our mission. 

At Mosaic, I would say every day is Random Acts of Kindness Day. Watch any of our direct support workers interact with those they serve, and you’ll see what I’m talking about. 

In my job as a storyteller for Mosaic, I have been lucky enough to visit nearly every one of our locations across the country. Each time, I am overwhelmed by the goodness and kindness I see modeled in the direct support staff. Many of those I have interviewed tell me they feel “called” to do the work they do.

Believe me, it is evident in the simplest of their actions. Whether it is helping someone prepare a meal or choose their clothing or assist with physical needs, the actions are done deliberately and with kindness.  

I Googled the definition of random, and it said, “made, done, happening, or chosen without method or conscious decision.” 

That’s the way people act when they’re called to something. It doesn’t take conscious thought. They just do kindness and thoughtfulness without having to think about what to do. It is as natural to them as breathing. 

It is what I see at work in many of Mosaic’s direct support workforce.

Mask-wearing during the COVID-19 pandemic has made me more aware of acts of kindness. The smiles and simple courtesies that facial expressions convey are largely absent when wearing masks. I find I need to do exaggerated gestures to make up for the lack of facial cues. Yet, ironically, wearing masks is an act of kindness and concern for others. 

I’m on board with promoting Random Acts of Kindness Day and Week. Even if we have to consciously think about being kind, it could still be a random kindness for the person who receives it. It may just be the lift they need.

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The Gift of a Forever Family
Cheryl and Conrad Swanson’s Generosity Moves Others to Give
Dustin Exemplifies How to Love and Serve

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